Minc Reactive Art Screen Ink | An Overview

Minc Reactive Art Screen Ink :: An Overview | @MaggieWMassey for @HeidiSwapp

Hey there everybody!

It’s me, Maggie! Back again with a look at one of Heidi’s new Mixed Media Products designed for use especially with the Minc machine – Reactive Art Screen Ink!

Minc Reactive Art Screen Ink :: An Overview | @MaggieWMassey for @HeidiSwapp

In order for me to show you just how this amazing product works, I’m going to need a few things…

Minc Reactive Art Screen Ink :: An Overview | @MaggieWMassey for @HeidiSwapp

An art screen, a scraper, the Reactive Art Screen Ink & some foil.

 

 

Minc Reactive Art Screen Ink :: An Overview | @MaggieWMassey for @HeidiSwapp

In case you’ve never used an art screen before, here’s a little overview (starring my well-loved and heavily used Heidi Swapp Woodgrain Art Screen)…

An art screen is like a stencil – sorta – in that it is a tool you can use to create a pattern on a piece of paper/acetate/fabric/vellum/whatever.

Now here’s where it differs from your average stencil…

An art screen is usually made of vinyl and is much thinner than a typical stencil.

In all of the negative (un-vinyl’d) spaces there is a tiny little screen…this is what keeps the design together and is, obviously, where the name art screen comes from. It is also what allows you to get a much more detailed pattern/design.

 

Minc Reactive Art Screen Ink :: An Overview | @MaggieWMassey for @HeidiSwapp

In addition, art screens are adhesive on one side so they remain in place without having to be taped down to your work surface.

Now let’s take a look at just how this thing works…

Minc Reactive Art Screen Ink :: An Overview | @MaggieWMassey for @HeidiSwapp

Wait just a second…didn’t I just say that the art screen itself was adhesive?

Why would I have to tape the edges?

I’m taping my edges in this example because I don’t want to chance getting any Art Screen Ink on any places on my paper other than over the art screen.

Any part of your paper that has the ink on it – whether that ink is in the proper place or not – will react with the foil.

If I’m inking only a small part of a design – or if the design has a wide edge – I will forgo the washi tape.

Minc Reactive Art Screen Ink :: An Overview | @MaggieWMassey for @HeidiSwapp

After my screen is all ready to go, it’s time to get to inkin’!

Minc Reactive Art Screen Ink :: An Overview | @MaggieWMassey for @HeidiSwapp

I like to apply my ink directly to my screen, but you can definitely squeeze out a small amount onto a pallet or craft mat if you prefer.

*NOTE: start with a small amount of Art Screen Ink and add more if need be. You’d be amazed at how far this stuff goes…

Minc Reactive Art Screen Ink :: An Overview | @MaggieWMassey for @HeidiSwapp

Take your scraper (or credit card or pallet knife or any straight edge) and drag your ink down over your screen in long, broad motions.

Minc Reactive Art Screen Ink :: An Overview | @MaggieWMassey for @HeidiSwapp

Make sure to cover the entire area in a thin coat of ink.

Minc Reactive Art Screen Ink :: An Overview | @MaggieWMassey for @HeidiSwapp

Minc Reactive Art Screen Ink :: An Overview | @MaggieWMassey for @HeidiSwapp

Remove your washi tape (if necessary) and lift your art screen immediately after you are finished applying your Art Screen Ink.

Wash your art screen with soap and warm water (or a baby wipe) and allow to air-dry upside-down to preserve the stickiness.

*NOTE: If you are inking more than one copy of the same design, you can usually do a few before you need to wash your screen. Just make sure your ink is not clumping in your screen. I do not, however, recommend this…I prefer to clean my screen after each use.

*NOTE: Do NOT allow the Art Screen Ink to dry in your art screen…it’s extremely difficult to remove once it’s dry and a build-up of ink will compromise your design.

Minc Reactive Art Screen Ink :: An Overview | @MaggieWMassey for @HeidiSwapp

Allow your design to dry…the time it takes you to wash your screen will probably be a sufficient. If you’d like, you can also dry your design with a heat tool.

Now this next step is where the magic happens…

Place your paper/acetate/fabric/vellum/whatever in your Minc transfer folder and cover with a piece of foil.

Minc Reactive Art Screen Ink :: An Overview | @MaggieWMassey for @HeidiSwapp

Run your folder through your Minc and ta-da!

Minc Reactive Art Screen Ink :: An Overview | @MaggieWMassey for @HeidiSwapp

Now you have a beautifully foiled art screen design!

Minc Reactive Art Screen Ink :: An Overview | @MaggieWMassey for @HeidiSwapp

Use your foiled designs as backgrounds for scrapbook pages, as an addition to cards or pocket-scrap pages or as art work on your gallery walls.

Heidi has a number of new art screens available for use with this amazing ink…and her wide selection of foil colors makes this project one you can return to again and again – each time with completely customized results!

Thanks so much for taking a look…I hope I’ve inspired you to try just one more way to add foiled elements to all your projects!

And for even more inspiration using Heidi’s new Minc Mixed Media products, including her Reactive Art Screen Ink, check out the newest series of Minc Classes at Big Picture Classes.

SUPPLIES: Heidi Swapp Minc Foil Applicating Machine, Minc Reactive Foil: Teal, Minc Reactive Art Screen Ink – all products used here can be found at Big Picture Classes

Media-Team-Page-maggie-fun002

Save

Share this Post!

Category: Inspiration

About the Author : Maggie Massey

0 Comment